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Display titleFAMEPedia:Today's featured article/July 31, 2021
Default sort keyToday's featured article/July 31, 2021
Page length (in bytes)1,454
NamespaceFAMEPedia
Page ID23209
Page content languageen - English
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Page creatorUgochimobi (talk | contribs)
Date of page creation08:51, 23 July 2021
Latest editorUgochimobi (talk | contribs)
Date of latest edit08:51, 23 July 2021
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The white-eyed river martin (Pseudochelidon sirintarae) is a passerine bird in the swallow family. First found in 1968, it is known only from a single wintering site in Thailand, and may be extinct, since there have been no confirmed sightings since 1980 despite targeted surveys in Thailand and Cambodia. The adult has mainly glossy greenish-black plumage, a white rump, and a tail with two long central feathers that widen to a racket-shaped tip. It has a white eye ring and a broad, bright greenish-yellow bill. The juvenile lacks the tail ornaments and is browner. Like other swallows, it feeds on insects caught in flight, and its wide bill suggests that it may take relatively large species. It roosts in reed beds in winter, and may nest in river sandbanks. Its apparent demise may have been hastened by trapping, loss of habitat and dam construction. The martin is one of only two birds endemic to Thailand. The country's government has featured the bird on a stamp and a commemorative coin. (Full article...)
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